Health

Some Pregnancy Management Tips that You Should Know

Every woman wants to stay active and healthy throughout her pregnancy. If you are pregnant then you must eat well, get sufficient sleep, do physical activities, and be optimistic. Taking care of your physical and emotional health is really very important for a healthy pregnancy. A mom’s good health is essential for a healthy baby. During pregnancy, being connected with doctors like a gynecologist, pediatrician, etc. is very important to ensure your own and your baby’s good health. At icareheal, we connect you with the best doctors around so that you can get medical aid whenever necessary. We provide you with an all-in-one app for doctors to make your work easier and much smoother.

Tips for Better Pregnancy Management

  1. Look after your Health and Go for regular check-ups

Schedule an appointment with your doctor as soon as you find out you’re pregnant. Your doctor will start by reviewing your medical history. He or she also will want to know about your symptoms. During this first appointment, urine and blood samples will be taken.  Urine tests check for bacteria, high sugar levels (which can be a sign of diabetes), and high protein levels (which can be a sign of preeclampsia, a type of high blood pressure during pregnancy). Blood tests check for blood cell count, blood type, low iron levels (anemia), and infectious diseases (such as syphilis, HIV, and hepatitis).

The doctor also may do other tests on your first visit. These may vary based on your background and risk for problems. Tests can include:

  • A pelvic exam to check the size and shape of your uterus (womb)
  • A Pap smear to screen for cervical cancer
  • An ultrasound to view your baby’s growth and position (An ultrasound uses sound waves to create an image of your baby on a video screen.)
  • After your first visit, you will have a prenatal visit every 4 weeks. In months 7 and 8, you will have a visit every 2 weeks. In your last month of pregnancy, the visits will occur weekly until you deliver your baby. At each visit, the doctor will check your weight and blood pressure and test your urine. The doctor will listen to your baby’s heartbeat and measure the height of your uterus after the 20th week. You should always discuss any issues or concerns you have with your doctor.

  1. How to Manage some Common Side-effects of Pregnancy

Morning sickness: Nausea or vomiting may strike anytime during the day (or night). Try eating frequent, small meals. Avoid foods that are greasy, spicy, or acidic. Some women are more nauseous when their stomach is empty. Keep crackers nearby to prevent an empty stomach. Talk to your doctor if morning sickness causes you to lose weight or lasts past the first 3 months of pregnancy.

Tiredness: Fatigue is common when you’re pregnant. Try to get enough rest or take naps if possible. Talk to your doctor if you have symptoms with fatigue. You may have anemia.

Leg cramps: Being active can help reduce leg cramps. Stretch the calf of your leg by flexing your foot toward your knee. Also stay hydrated by drinking lots of water.

Constipation: Drink plenty of fluids. Eat foods with lots of fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, and bran cereal. Don’t take laxatives without talking to your doctor first. Stool softeners may be safer than laxatives.

Hemorrhoids: Try to avoid becoming constipated. Don’t strain during bowel movements. Clean yourself well after a bowel movement. Wet wipes may feel better than toilet paper. Take warm soaks (sitz baths) if necessary.

Urinating more often: You may need to urinate more often when you are pregnant. Changing hormones can be a factor. Also, as your baby grows, he or she will put pressure on your bladder.

Varicose veins: Avoid clothing that fits tightly around your waist or legs. Rest and put your feet up as much as you can. Avoid sitting or standing still for long periods. Ask your doctor about support or compression hose. These can help prevent or ease varicose veins.

Moodiness: Your hormones are on a roller coaster ride during pregnancy. Your whole life is changing. Don’t be too hard on yourself. Get help right away if you feel sad or think about suicide.

Heartburn: Eat frequent, small meals. Avoid spicy, greasy, or acidic foods. Don’t lie down right after eating. Ask your doctor about taking antacids.

Yeast infections: The amount of discharge from your vagina can increase during pregnancy. Yeast infections, which can cause discharge, are common as well. Talk to your doctor if you see any unusual discharge or if it has an odor.

Bleeding gums: Brush and floss regularly. See your dentist for cleanings. Don’t avoid dental visits because you’re pregnant. Just be sure to tell your dentist you’re pregnant.

Stuffy nose: Changes in the levels of the female hormone estrogen can cause a stuffy nose. You may also have nosebleeds.

Edema(retaining fluid): Rest with your legs up as much as you can. Lie on your left side while sleeping. This position helps blood flow from your legs back to your heart better. Don’t use diuretics (water pills).

Skin changes: Stretch marks appear as red marks on your skin. Lotion with shea butter can help keep your skin moist and reduce itchy, dry skin. Stretch marks can’t be avoided. They do often fade after pregnancy. You may have other skin changes. These can include darkening of the skin on your face or around your nipples. Some women get a dark line below their belly button. Try to stay out of the sun or use sunscreen to help lessen these marks. Most marks will fade after pregnancy.

How to treat Postpartum depression?

The common types of treatment for postpartum depression are:

Therapy: During therapy, you talk to a therapist, psychologist, or social worker to learn strategies to change how depression makes you think, feel, and act.

Medicine: There are different types of medicines for postpartum depression. All of them must be prescribed by your doctor or nurse. The most common type is antidepressants. Antidepressants can help relieve symptoms of depression and some can be taken while you’re breastfeeding. Antidepressants may take several weeks to start working.

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT): This can be used in extreme cases to treat postpartum depression.

These treatments can be used alone or together. Talk with your doctor or nurse about the benefits and risks of taking medicine to treat depression when you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Having depression can affect your baby. Getting treatment is important for you and your baby. Taking medicines for depression or going to therapy does not make you a bad mother or a failure. Getting help is a sign of strength.

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